SA’s Kgothatso Montjane vie for title in historic Wimbledon singles final

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Weekend Breakfast Host Sara-Jayne King chats with tennis analyst Bruce Davidson about SA wheelchair tennis ace Kgothatso ‘KG’ Montjane.

  • Kgothatso Montjane made history as the first black woman from South Africa to reach a singles final at Wimbledon
  • Montjane qualified for the women’s singles and doubles finals at Wimbledon this weekend
  • Although Montjane and her doubles partner lost in the women’s wheelchair doubles final at Wimbledon on Saturday, the singles title is still in sight later today.

South African wheelchair tennis ace Kgothatso ‘KG’ Montjane sealed her place in the singles final at Wimbledon with a victory over Japan’s Momoko Ohtani on July 9, 2021. Photo: @ TennisSA / Twitter

All eyes are on South African wheelchair tennis ace Kgothatso ‘KG’ Montjane who advanced to the women’s singles and doubles finals at Wimbledon this weekend.

Montjane is South Africa’s highest ranked wheelchair tennis player and fifth in the world.

RELATED: Kgothatso Montjane, 5th Best Wheelchair Tennis Player in the World, Shares Her Story

She made history this weekend by becoming the first black South African woman to reach the final at Wimbledon.

On Saturday, Montjane and her doubles partner Lucy Shuker of the United Kingdom were beaten in the women’s wheelchair doubles final.

But the Limpopo-born star still has a chance to win the title in Sunday’s Wimbledon wheelchair singles final against world number one Diede de Groot of the Netherlands.

The final will take place today shortly after 2 p.m.

Tennis analyst Bruce Davidson says he’s thrilled with how far Montjane has come in her career given that she only started playing tennis 15 years ago.

The 35-year-old only picked up a racket for the first time at the age of 20 and now has a hit for Wimbledon glory this afternoon.

“It’s just an incredible achievement,” Davidson told CapeTalk host Sara-Jayne King.

The tennis correspondent says Montjane has shown tremendous strength both on and off the tennis court, achieving great success without the best coaches or sponsors.

“She really got away with it because she comes from humble beginnings and from a disadvantaged background …

I’m sure they’ll be ready as best they can for today’s game … especially her mind, she’s strong! The conversations were very positive last night.

Bruce Davidson, Tennis Analyst and Executive Chairman of the BLD Group

She told me last night on WhatsApp that it was very nice for her to have managed to play the double yesterday to give her some groove for the singles today … It gave her a little bit of training.

Bruce Davidson, Tennis Analyst and Executive Chairman of BLD Group

It’s going to be tough today, she’s playing against a really talented Dutch player, the world number one, Diede de Groot.

Bruce Davidson, Tennis Analyst and Executive Chairman of the BLD Group

This has been such a trip for this Limpopo born star, she didn’t decide to start playing wheelchair tennis until she was 20 … normally when a player doesn’t start playing until she is 20 years old. 8 years old, he has no hope. being a professional.

Bruce Davidson, Tennis Analyst and Executive Chairman of the BLD Group


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